T-X programma ... the new trainer ... or next light multi-roll fighter ?

Gestart door Harald, 06/06/2016 | 10:41 uur

Sparkplug

A fighter without a gun . . . is like an airplane without a wing.

-- Brigadier General Robin Olds, USAF.

Harald

Boeing, Navy Discuss T-7A As Goshawk Replacement 

The Navy has "no program of record right now" to replace its T-45 trainers, said Chuck Dabundo, Boeing VP for T-7 programs, but the company is "working closely with them in answering questions" about the T-7A Red Hawk's capabilities.

Boeing is talking with the Navy about the T-7A Red Hawk trainer replacing the service's aging T-45 Goshawk jet trainer, says Chuck Dabundo, program vice president.

"We've been in some discussions with the Navy about a couple of different variants of the T-7," he told reporters today. "There is no program of record right now, [but] we're working closely with them in answering questions about the platform and its capabilities. And we're hopeful that it will be able to play a role in the Navy's training systems as well."

The Navy in May 2020 released a request for information for a new trainer, capable of landing both on a runway and on a carrier, under its Undergraduate Jet Training System (UJTS) effort. Importantly, the Navy wants an off-the-shelf solution that can be fielded by 2028. It also wants a two-pilot configuration complete with ejection seats.  Vendors had until July 2020 to respond to the RFI, but no formal request for proposals has yet been released.

T7-A production for the Air Force is proceeding to schedule, according to Boeing officials speaking during today's webinar with reporters in advance of the annual February Air Force Association show (virtual this year due to the pandemic.) Delivery of the first fully capable aircraft is slated for 2023.

The first production aircraft is set to roll off the line later this year, Dabundo said. Testing will take place both at Taylor Field and Edwards AFB, he explained. Initial flight testing using the production representative jet (PRJ) has been ongoing for about six months, he elaborated. That will be followed by a second stage using the EMD (engineering, manufacturing and development) model later this year.

"The flight test program is being jointly executed by Boeing and the Air Force," Dabundo noted.

Boeing and teammate SAAB won a $9.2 billion contract to build the T-7A. The Air Force intends to buy 351, with related simulators and ground equipment to train pilots to fly fifth and fourth generation aircraft. But the indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (ID/IF) contract allows for a buy of up to 475 jets.

The Air Force also has ordered T-7A 46 simulators and associated ground equipment, but can purchase up to 120 simulators under the current contract. The first of those are also slated to be delivered in 2023, just prior to the first fully capable aircraft.

Boeing further has set its sights on the possibility that the trainer could be used by foreign air forces as a light-attack aircraft — which is a typical spin-off mission for advanced trainer jets. Dabundo demurred providing details about what modifications the T-7A might require to serve in such a role, only noting that it "would really be very dependent on what the requirements were for the specific customer."

https://breakingdefense.com/2021/02/boeing-navy-discuss-t-7a-as-goshawk-replacement/

Harald

Boeing Begins T-7A Red Hawk Advanced Trainer Production

First in U.S. Air Force "eSeries" aircraft validates digital design and build for advanced trainer

ST. LOUIS, Feb. 23, 2021 — A new era in aircraft design and build has begun as the first U.S. portion of the T-7A Red Hawk advanced trainer has officially entered the Boeing [NYSE:BA] jet's state-of-the-art production line.

The training jet, designated the eT-7A Red Hawk by the U.S. Air Force because of its digital heritage, was fully designed using 3D model-based definition and data management systems developed at Boeing during the last two decades. The T-7A Red Hawk employed the digital engineering and design of the Boeing T-X aircraft that went from firm concept to first flight in just 36 months.

"The future of air dominance lies in the ability to move quickly, take smart risks and partner in new ways to get the job done," said Shelley Lavender, Boeing senior vice president of Strike, Surveillance and Mobility. "By creating aircraft and systems along a digital thread, we can accelerate build times and increase quality and affordability for our customers in a way that has never been done before."

The Advanced Pilot Training System also incorporates leading-edge ground-based live and virtual simulators to give students and instructors a "real as it gets" experience.

In September 2018, the U.S. Air Force awarded Boeing a $9.2 billion contract to supply 351 advanced trainer aircraft and 46 associated ground-based training simulators. Saab is teamed with Boeing on the trainer and provides the aft fuselage of the jet.

"This is a historic moment for the program and industry," said Chuck Dabundo, Boeing vice president of T-7 Programs. "The build process leverages full-size determinant assembly, which allows technicians to build the aircraft with minimal tooling and drilling during the assembly process. The digital process accounts for a 75% increase in first-time quality."

Boeing is the world's largest aerospace company and leading provider of commercial airplanes, defense, space and security systems, and global services. As a top U.S. exporter, the company supports commercial and government customers in more than 150 countries and leverages the talents of a global supplier base. Building on a legacy of aerospace leadership, Boeing continues to lead in technology and innovation, deliver for its customers and invest in its people and future growth.

https://boeing.mediaroom.com/news-releases-statements?item=130830

Sparkplug

A fighter without a gun . . . is like an airplane without a wing.

-- Brigadier General Robin Olds, USAF.

jurrien visser (JuVi op Twitter)

Citaat van: Huzaar1 op 15/07/2020 | 19:59 uur
1sqn erbij voor de Belgen?
Dat is financieel echt totaal unfeasable. Dat leger heeft haar huidige omvang niet eens goed gefinancieerd, ik denk dat het niet lang duurt voor we in het zuiden weer een totale reorganisatie van hun strijdkrachten gaan zien. Geld erbij zie ik met de huidige economische problemen niet gebeuren.

Ik vrees dat je hier een punt hebt.

Huzaar1

Citaat van: jurrien visser (JuVi op Twitter) op 15/07/2020 | 18:06 uur
Wellicht is 1 sqn voor de Belgen een optie.

1sqn erbij voor de Belgen?
Dat is financieel echt totaal unfeasable. Dat leger heeft haar huidige omvang niet eens goed gefinancieerd, ik denk dat het niet lang duurt voor we in het zuiden weer een totale reorganisatie van hun strijdkrachten gaan zien. Geld erbij zie ik met de huidige economische problemen niet gebeuren.
"Going to war without France is like going deer hunting without your accordion" US secmindef - Jed Babbin"

jurrien visser (JuVi op Twitter)

Citaat van: Harald op 15/07/2020 | 17:19 uur
Precies, dat is ook mijn gedachte.
en ja ... dat hebben we 2 type vliegtuigen, maar een ATF-7A lijk me qua exploitatie, onderhoud een stuk aantrekkelijker dan een F-35A.

En in light Attack lijkt me zo'n toestel prima geschikt.

Wellicht is 1 sqn voor de Belgen een optie.

Harald

Citaat van: Sparkplug op 15/07/2020 | 14:10 uur
Laten we eerst maar zien wat de T-7A kan zodra deze operationeel wordt op bijvoorbeeld Sheppard AFB.

Citaat van: jurrien visser (JuVi op Twitter) op 15/07/2020 | 14:17 uur
Ik zou me kunnen voorstellen dat een lichte aanvulling op de F35 een, in veel opzichten, attractieve rol kan spelen als luchtoverwicht gerealiseerd is.

Precies, dat is ook mijn gedachte.
en ja ... dat hebben we 2 type vliegtuigen, maar een ATF-7A lijk me qua exploitatie, onderhoud een stuk aantrekkelijker dan een F-35A.

En in light Attack lijkt me zo'n toestel prima geschikt. 

Oorlogsvis

Citaat van: jurrien visser (JuVi op Twitter) op 15/07/2020 | 13:51 uur
Ik zou het prima vinden als onze KLu het uiteindelijk zou houden bij 3 squadrons F35A's (52 totaal) en dit aanvult met 2 squadrons T-7's in een multirole variant, of toch maar een aanvulling op de F-35 met UCAV's?

Het gewenst aantal waar voor gelobbyd wordt ligt immers op minimaal 67 exemplaren.
dit soort toestellen naast de F-35 ben ik altijd een fan van geweest hier op dit forum....als je toch al luchtoverwicht bezit en een primitieve tegenstander
zonder airdefence etc dan is een F-35 overkill en kan je bijvoorbeeld hetzelfde resultaat bereiken met een Stuka ..

De Syrische luchtmacht gebruikt veelal ook alleen maar de L-39 Albatross voor het bombarderen van terroristen ..dat is ook een goedkope trainer en het
resultaat is hetzelfde je hangt er een bom onder en gooit hem naar beneden. Geen tegenstanders in de lucht die je kunnen neerschieten.

Sparkplug

Upside down...all-around

Boeing T-7A goes inverted to test jet's systems and performance
July 14, 2020 in Defense

Proving out the Boeing T-7A Advanced Trainer in its first inverted flights, Boeing Test & Evaluation pilots Matt Giese and William Berryman are the first to take the agile trainer, developed for the U.S. Air Force, through a rugged series of maneuvers to test the jet's fuel system at all angles.

"What we do is roll the airplane upside down," said Dan Draeger, chief pilot, Boeing Tactical Aircraft, Boeing Test & Evaluation. "We need to make sure that things like fuel, oil and everything else feeds properly to the airplane during all maneuvers."

"We roll to an inverted position and push to negative one-g, so it's a little uncomfortable. Your kind of hanging in your seat straps inside the cockpit," added Giese.

Throughout the series of more than a dozen inverted test points the aircrew proved the Saab designed fuel system for the T-7A is efficient and reliable in the advanced jet as it prepares for a life of future training missions and beyond.

In September 2018, the U.S. Air Force awarded Boeing a $9.2 billion contract to supply T-7A Red Hawk aircraft and trainers to replacing their aging T-38 training fleet. The T-7A was designed, built and flown in just 36 months using state-of-the-art design and manufacturing techniques. The aircraft will train fighter pilots of the future with an advanced cockpit, digital fly-by-wire controls and an integrated ground-based training system.

"It's a great training lead-in to the current fighter fleet," said Giese as he climbed out of the cockpit after a test flight. "It could serve multiple roles as a light attack or other fighter in many missions."

http://www.boeing.com/features/2020/07/upside-down-all-around.page

A fighter without a gun . . . is like an airplane without a wing.

-- Brigadier General Robin Olds, USAF.

jurrien visser (JuVi op Twitter)

#155
Citaat van: Sparkplug op 15/07/2020 | 14:10 uur
Wil je wel zoveel verschillende fixed-wing types hebben?

Ik zou me kunnen voorstellen dat een lichte aanvulling op de F35 een, in veel opzichten, attractieve rol kan spelen als luchtoverwicht gerealiseerd is.

Bij een gelijkwaardig tegenstander zet zo'n lichte kist m.i. minder zonden aan de dijk.

Sparkplug

Citaat van: jurrien visser (JuVi op Twitter) op 15/07/2020 | 13:51 uur
Ik zou het prima vinden als onze KLU het uiteindelijk zou houden bij 3 squadrons F35A's (52 totaal) en dit aanvult met 2 squadrons T-7's in een multirole variant, of toch maar een aanvulling op de F-35 met UCAV's?

Het gewenst aantal waar voor gelobbyd wordt ligt immers op minimaal 67 exemplaren.

Wil je wel zoveel verschillende fixed-wing types hebben? Dan zal toch duidelijk moeten zijn wat men precies aan taken wil kunnen uitvoeren. UCAV's kunnen veel, maar niet alles. Wordt er bijvoorbeeld besloten om toch weer met MPA's te gaan vliegen, dan heb je ook daar personeel voor nodig. DHC en het toekomstige Air Mobility Command vragen ook de nodige aandacht.

Laten we eerst maar zien wat de T-7A kan zodra deze operationeel wordt op bijvoorbeeld Sheppard AFB.
A fighter without a gun . . . is like an airplane without a wing.

-- Brigadier General Robin Olds, USAF.

jurrien visser (JuVi op Twitter)

#153
Citaat van: Harald op 15/07/2020 | 13:29 uur
Boeing sees T-7 as combat replacement for Northrop F-5 and Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jet


Ik zou het prima vinden als onze KLu het uiteindelijk zou houden bij 3 squadrons F35A's (52 totaal) en dit aanvult met 2 squadrons T-7's in een multirole variant, of toch maar een aanvulling op de F-35 met UCAV's?

Het gewenst aantal waar voor gelobbyd wordt ligt immers op minimaal 67 exemplaren.

Harald

Boeing sees T-7 as combat replacement for Northrop F-5 and Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jet

Boeing believes a light-attack variant of its T-7 jet trainer could replace the world's ageing fleets of Northrop F-5 and Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jet combat aircraft.

Boeing has long touted the "growth potential" of the T-7, noting that the trainer could be retrofitted with weapons, such as missiles or bombs, to serve as a combat aircraft. The company has said that it believes there is a global market for 2,600 T-7s, as trainers, light-attack or aggressor aircraft.

The Chicago-based airframer declines to say what countries are likely buyers of the T-7. However, the firm notes in response to a question from FlightGlobal that light combat jets such as the F-5 and Alpha Jet would be good candidates to be replaced by the T-7. Both of those aircraft also serve trainer roles within various air forces.

There are 435 examples of the F-5 still in service worldwide, according to Cirium fleets data. The light jet was first delivered in 1964 and ceased production in 1989, according to Northrop. Of the worldwide fleet still in operation, the jets have an average age of 41.4 years. The F-5 is operated by 17 different countries, including the air forces of Brazil, Kenya, Morocco and Thailand.

There are 174 examples of the Alpha Jet still in service worldwide, Cirium data shows. The French and German-made light jet first took flight in 1973, according to Dassault. Of the worldwide active fleet, the jets have an average age of 38 years. The aircraft is operated by 11 countries, including Egypt, France and Morocco.

Boeing notes that many potential sales opportunities for the T-7, as a trainer or combat aircraft, are likely to come from the Asia-Pacific region. "We do see some strong interest in that region," says Thomas Breckenridge, vice-president of international sales in Boeing's strike, surveillance and mobility business unit.

The manufacturer is on contract to build up to 351 examples for the US Air Force (USAF), with the first aircraft scheduled for delivery in 2023. The USAF variant of the trainer is called the T-7A Red Hawk. The jet is scheduled to achieve initial operational capability by 2024 and full operational capability by 2034.

Testing of two prototypes of the T-7A is under way, with more than 200 flights on the aircraft completed to date. Boeing has started building its first engineering, manufacturing and development variant of the aircraft for the USAF, but declines to say when that aircraft will first fly.

https://www.flightglobal.com/farnborough-2020/boeing-sees-t-7-as-combat-replacement-for-northrop-f-5-and-dassault/dornier-alpha-jet/139289.article

Sparkplug

Boeing progresses Red Hawk EMD testing

14 JULY 2020

by Gareth Jennings

Boeing is progressing the engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) element of its contract to deliver 351 new T-7A Red Hawk advanced jet trainer aircraft to the US Air Force (USAF), reporting 80% completion of the first phase.

Speaking at the company's first 'virtual' pre-Farnborough International Airshow event on 14 July, Vice-President of International Sales, Strike, Surveillance and Mobility Thomas Breckenridge said that the first of three EMD phases had completed more than 200 test flights of the two production-representative jets (PRJs) currently flying.

"Significant progress is being made, [and] we are on track for initial operating capability in 2024," Breckenridge said, added that many of the USAF performance targets had been exceeded.

With EMD Phase 1 proceeding on track, Breckenridge noted that hot-weather trials, high angle-of-attack (AoA) with no nose boom, and a continuation of in-flight engine restart tests would be conducted during the next few weeks.

News of the good progression followed the successful completion of the USAF's critical design reviews (CDRs) for the aircraft. This milestone, announced by the US Air Force Life-Cycle Management Center (AFLCMC) on 9 June, was reached when the Aircraft CDR and overall System CDR were signed off as important steps on the path to production for the Red Hawk, solidifying the aircraft and subsystem designs.

The conclusion of the Aircraft CDR and System CDR followed the successful completion earlier in the year of the CDR for the ground-based elements of the jet trainer. The T-7A Ground Based Training Systems (GBTS) CDR paved the way for manufacturing on the ground-based elements of the USAF's aircrew training system to commence.

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One of the two production-representative jets that have flown more than 200 times in support of the current EMD testing. (Janes/Gareth Jennings)

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/news-detail/boeing-progresses-red-hawk-emd-testing
A fighter without a gun . . . is like an airplane without a wing.

-- Brigadier General Robin Olds, USAF.